Just Call Me a Super Hero

How’s that for an attention grabbing title?

I feel like a super hero after the night we had. Chad was set up on his pump yesterday! YAY. We went with the Tandem T:slim. It seemed to be operator friendly. He isn’t a techy guy and it’s the one he felt most comfortable with. It’s amazing that he can dose whenever. He doesn’t have to dread the shot. he doesn’t have to “catch it up later”, because he dreads the shot. WE LOVE THAT PART!

However, it was a bit of a rough night. I told him I would get up several times to check his blood sugar, since it was the first night on the pump. He was 125 at bedtime and more than 3 hours after dinner, which is an amazing blood sugar for him. For the first time ever, he didn’t eat a snack or anything. That trust and confidence was so hard! When I woke up at midnight, his blood sugar was 50. I gave him about 40 carbs of chocolate milk. I woke up at 3 to check and his blood sugar was 70. Another 40 carbs! When he woke up at 5, took forever in the bathroom,  was stumbling a bit, I got up and checked him. 36!!!!

I told him it was okay to go into work late. Usually he doesn’t. He gets back on the saddle and makes it into work on time, but I wanted to make sure he was okay first. I quickly googled “How long does Lantus stay in the system?” He was taking it twice a day, half a day’s dose at 8am and the other half at 8pm. His trainer set his pump up so his basal (this is the background insulin that runs continuously all day) didn’t start until after 8pm last night, but we are pretty sure he still had the Lantus from yesterday morning in his system as well, since it can last 18-26 hours! He conferred with his trainer this morning and she agreed that it was likely. Just to be safe she walked him through lowering the basal rate just a bit. (from 2.0 per hour to 1.8 per hour)

As far as the first day on the pump, he is loving it. He really likes not having to take shots. He loves that he can input his blood sugar and carbs and it will figure out his insulin dose. This is a new thing for us and we are fumbling around a bit, but in a week it should be second nature. He has done one infusion set. He will be doing a cartridge change and infusion change tomorrow morning with the trainer.

He has been approved for a CGM (continuous glucose monitor). This will be his next step.

I am hopeful that today will be a better day. He did end up going to work and got there just a little late. He is an excellent family provider and he hates missing time from work. Sometimes diabetes comes first!

ETA: I guess I should explain the super hero comment. I feel like a super hero after saving his life three times last night. :p I’m tired, it makes ME feel better.

Hi, Hi, Hi

Or high, high, high, Whatever the case may be.

Chad had a doctor appointment yesterday. He got a cortisone shot in his hip, because he had what presented itself to be bursitis. His blood sugars have been pretty good, but after the appointment, he had a tough time keeping it below 300. It was fine at lunch, then skyrocketed after that. We could say it might be what he had for lunch, but it was left over dinner, so who knows. He was thinking it might be the cortisone shot.

Last night he took about 20 units of insulin to compensate for the high blood sugar and the birthday cupcakes we had for our 10 year old. This is way more than he usually takes, so I got up at 2AM to test his blood sugar. It had dropped a little, but it sky rocketed again this morning, and was still high near lunch time. He called his doctor and they said “Don’t eat carbs and go for a walk”. He texted me along with a “WTF” for emphasis and I said “Well,  that sounds like a pretty good plan, actually”. So he ditched the left over lasagna from his lunch, but ate everything else. He texted a bit ago and said his blood sugar was 160-something. So that stinky old doctor’s advice must’ve worked.

I told him to be patient and ride it out, because panicking creates the yo-yo affect, Sky rocket, plummet, over compensate, repeat steps, which is just frustrating. You really do have to be patient  with diabetes (when it’s not an emergency, OMG get the Glucagon situation). It’s hard to ride it out though, because we’re human and we want things to be better five minutes ago.

The good news is that his A1C is down to 6.8%! His doctor was impressed with his A1C and cholesterol numbers. His kidney function has declined a bit in the past year. I really wish they would give more information than just “kidney function is declining”. WHAT DOES THAT MEAN? I’m assuming that if it was  an emergency, they would say more?

And the pump lady called to set up an appointment. We are one step closer to pumping that man up. 🙂

Game Changers for Diabetics

You might find this link interesting:

http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/new-smart-insulin-patch-could-be-game-changer

I don’t get too excited about things, yet, because I know it can take years and years, but I thought this was interesting. Anything to make those frequent shots better is a win in my book. I can’t imagine what it is like for my husband or for any of the other diabetics, tied to a significant other, not of their choosing. Diabetes is a stalker that will not be ignored, only accommodated.

Anyway, check out the link, ignore the name of the website, and tell me what you think.